Japanese engineers create a Real Life Transformer

Posted on April 29, 2018.

The real-life 12ft Transformer that morphs from a robot into a working two-seater CAR within a minute

Watching interview

Japanese engineers have unveiled a robot that transforms into a car that can actually carry people on board, in what developers claim is a world-first.

The 3.7-metre (12.1-feet)-tall two seater robot ‘J-deite RIDE’ can transform into a sports car in a process that takes about a minute.

It can walk at 100 metres per hour (0.06 mph) or run on its four wheels but developers say they’ve never really tested it outside the factory cargo bay area.

Japanese engineers have unveiled a robot that transforms into a car that can actually carry people on board, in what developers claim is a world-first

The 3.7-metre (12.1-feet)-tall two-seater robot ‘J-deite RIDE’ can transform into a sportscar in a process that takes about a minute

As a car, it measures 4 metres (13 feet) long and 1.4 metres (4.6 feet) high.

During the transformation the car seats and hood lift up and the robot’s head appears, writes Asahi.

Two people, including a driver, can fit into the ‘cockpit’ but the machine can also be controlled wirelessly.

In the video they are seen waving at the camera as the transformation takes place.

Tokyo-based CEO of Brave Robotics, Kenji Ishida, said he was motivated by his childhood transformer heroes in anime movies.

‘The robots I’ve seen in animation movies since childhood all had this kind of look and they transform into or combined with each other to become something else with people on board,’ Mr Ishida said.

‘So I grew up believing that robots had to be capable of such things, which became my motivation to develop this robot.’

Transformers (pictured) is a series of American science fiction action films which inspired Kenji Ishida to make his machine

It can technically walk at 30 km/h (18.6 mph) or run on its four wheels but developers said they’ve never really tested it outside the factory cargo bay area

WHAT IS THE ‘J-DEITE RIDE’ TRANSFORMER ROBOT?

The J-Deite RIDE robot can transform from a two-seater humanoid robot into a sports car in a process that takes about a minute.

The machine is 3.7 metres (12.1-feet) tall when stood in its robot configuration, and measures 4 metres (13 feet) long and 1.4 metres (4.6 feet) high as a car.

In its car form, the robot can reach speeds of 38mph (60kph), while its top walking speed is 100 metres per hour (0.06 mph).

The J-Deite robot can transform from a two-seater humnoid robot (pictured) into a sports car in a process that takes about a minute

During the transformation the car seats and hood lift up and the robot’s head appears, writes Asahi.

Two people, including a driver, can fit into the ‘cockpit’ but the machine can also be controlled wirelessly.

The first prototype, which weighed 77lbs (35kg), was unveiled at the annual Digital Content Expo in Tokyo in October 2014.

It is powered by ‘V-Sido OS’ software designed by creator Wataru Yoshizaki to allow anyone to control humanoid robots.

The machine is 3.7 metres (12.1-feet) tall when stood in its robot configuration, and measures 4 metres (13 feet) long and 1.4 metres (4.6 feet) high as a car (pictured)

As a car it measures 4 metres (13 feet) long and 1.4 metres (4.6 feet) high. During the transformation the car seats and hood lift up and the robot’s head appears

Two people, including a driver, can fit into the ‘cockpit’ but the machine can also be controlled wirelessly. In the video they are seen waving at the camera as the transformation takes place

CEO of Brave Robotics, Kenji Ishida, said he was motivated by his childhood transformer heroes in anime movies

He initiated the project with Asratec, an affiliate of the Japanese mobile phone giant SoftBank, and a roller coaster manufacturer Sansei Technologies.

While admitting that it may seem like an expensive toy, Mr Ishida said the robot is an attempt to inspire others and broaden the human imagination.

Developers said they will begin with utilising the technology in entertainment industry, such as amusement park and street parades.

Mr Ishida initiated the project with Asratec, an affiliate of the Japanese mobile phone giant SoftBank, and a roller coaster manufacturer Sansei Technologies

While admitting that it may seem like an expensive toy, Mr Ishida said the robot is an attempt to inspire others and broaden the human imagination

The company has spent three years developing the machine. Mr Ishida built the first version back in 2015.

At the time, developers said they hoped it would be ready last year.

The first prototype, which weighed 77lbs (35kg), was unveiled at the annual Digital Content Expo in Tokyo on 23 October 2014.

It is powered by something called ‘V-Sido OS’, software designed by creator Wataru Yoshizaki to allow anyone to control humanoid robots.

Developers said they will begin with utilising the technology in entertainment industry, such as amusement park and street parades

The company has spent three years developing machine. Mr Ishida built the first version back in 2015. At the time, developers said they hoped it would be ready last year

The first prototype, which weighed 77lbs (35kg), was unveiled at the annual Digital Content Expo in Tokyo on 23 October 2014

Source: Daily Mail